A Montage of Oil Wells on the C.T. Carney Lease Pt 1- Ken Bailey

Photo by Ken Bailey

Photo by Ken Bailey

A drilling rig sinks a new well on the C.T. Carney lease in late summer 1972. The well was #27X, and it would be one of the last wells photographed by the teenage "Oil Geek" before his family moved away from Rangely.

 

Photo by Ken Bailey

Photo by Ken Bailey

A big Lufkin works C.T. Carney #21X in the early summer of 1971 or '72, unaware that, in the distance, an O.D.I. submersible pump is sneaking up on it to take its place. The sixties and seventies were a time of great transition for the Rangely field, bringing in the big Air Balance Lufkins at their start and ending with the field almost totally converted to underground "submersible" pumps.

Photo by Ken Bailey

Photo by Ken Bailey

Here's the "dirty bird" himself. Oil Geek hated the submersible pumps -- all flavors of them. However, Oil Geek's income was not dependent upon the production of the oil field, so being able to hate them was a luxury for a teenage photographer that oilmen did not have.

Photo by Ken Bailey

Photo by Ken Bailey

ROAD TO RANGELY! I almost want to hear the theme-song from the old TV western, "Bonanza", here -- as Highway 64 sweeps down from the larger plateau of the major deep field, across this small step (Note oil well C.T. Carney #1 on the right) -- and then down another hill before crossing the river into Rangely town. The rooflines of "Central Welding" are visible just over the brow of the hill on the left.

Photo By Ken Bailey

Photo By Ken Bailey

A Bethlehem pump lays in the weeds in pieces after being removed from C.T. Carney well #3 (due to replacement by a larger Lufkin model). The motor and fan belt housing is on the left, then the horsehead, fuel tank, frame and crank housing with counterweights and flywheel attached ... and the walking beam stacked behind it. The "Bethlehem" nameplate is clearly visible. This pump had sat just over the brow of the cliff to the right, and had appeared in publications about Rangely town, because the town was visible beneath it and it was easily accessible to photographers.