This is why...

“Rural Colorado is the picture of what Colorado promotes itself to be,” Snidow says.  “Rural communities are what give the state the flavor and the feel of Colorado. We’re really the culture of Colorado.”

Colorado Divide: Seismic shifts create rural-urban chasm in the culture, economy, and politics of the state

Remeber another blog a while back about the Great Divide? A lot of people ask me why I started Home on the Rangely...including my husband...ahem! And I can see how it might be something of a head-scratcher.

Well, the quote above sums it up pretty well. According to this article, Rio Blanco County meets the population density definition of a 'frontier.' This (mostly city) girl has lived a lot of places, some much more remote than Rangely, CO. In fact, until I moved to Rangely 13 years ago, I had moved at least every three years of the thirty-three I had to name at that time. So thirteen years feels like a lifetime. I got married and brought my babies home here, so in a way, it is a life time. Maybe that's why. Lord knows it's not for the money, but as a woman in the video clip says...we survive, we hung in here.

Then and now...two Stages in the Life of oil well Levison #7 ... in 1970, and again in 1992. Photos by   Home on the Rangely   contributor Ken Bailey.

Then and now...two Stages in the Life of oil well Levison #7 ... in 1970, and again in 1992.
Photos by Home on the Rangely contributor Ken Bailey.

Maybe it's because I am both outsider and insider in this small, tight knit community--a stranger in a strangenew land--but the one I finally got to call..home. I see a traditional, Western way of life which is still vibrant in the people here. I want to record, tell, and celebrate their stories. I see the struggle which comes with decline, and the need to change... and the ensuing battle which inevitably defines that attempt. I try to connect these disparate elements with a little magazine that honors the past with a desire to serve the future. My hope is that by shining a light on a rich and unique culture and history, change becomes growth, fueled by strong roots.

Anyway, tip of a genuine cowboy hat to multi-generational rancher and former County Commissioner Jon Hill, who has worked hard on many levels to promote economic prosperity in our county, and for sharing this excellent article. It speaks to some of the many challenges and opportunities which abound in our neck of the high desert... I could probably add a few more to the list... Anyway, read it and let me know what you think. It's great. And come back and visit us again.

Elizabeth Robinson Wiley, Editor & Publisher, Home on the Rangely- authentic life in the wild and remote west.

Colorado Divide: Seismic shifts create rural-urban chasm in the culture, economy and politics of the state: Demographics, migration signal widening differences between two Colorados